Thursday, September 5, 2013

In the Name of Roma! is Released!

“IN THE NAME OF ROMA”

Company and Platoon level scenarios for the Eastern Front, 1941

In July of 1941, the 80° Roma Regiment of the Pasubio Division boarded a train bound for Romania. Along with the rest of the Italian Expeditionary Corps in Russia (Corpo di Spedizione Italiano), they would advance through the Ukraine alongside their German allies. In the coming months, the 80° would be engaged in brutal fighting across 1400 miles of the Eastern Front – covering most of that on foot.

IN THE NAME OF ROMA is a wargame supplement that contains 30 company and platoon level scenarios covering the actions of the 80a Roma Regiment from August to December of 1941. You’ll follow the 80th from the open steppe to the Donetz industrial basin, including the amphibious attacks across the Dnieper, and the fateful decision of Column Chiarimonti to attempt to seize Nikitovka.

IN THE NAME OF ROMA includes:

• 30 scenarios divided in six distinct campaigns
• Historical background information and period area maps
• Italian and Soviet briefing for each scenario
• Formation information and stats for Early War Italians and Soviets
• Forward by Richard Clarke

Though primarily written for the Too Fat Lardies rules systems (I Ain’t Been Shot Mum; Troops, Weapons, and Tactics; and the newly released Chain of Command), the scenarios in IN THE NAME OF ROMA work equally well with Arc of Fire, Bolt Action, Flames of War or your favorite rules system.

IN THE NAME OF ROMA is available for $11 US. Send the money via PayPal to cstoesen@corecard.com and I will e-mail the PDF to you as soon as possible.

Follow this link to get a free sample scenario from the book. Note that In the Name of Roma is now available from Amazon as well.

It is also available on Wargame Vault.

35 comments:

  1. Hoping this is a prosperous adventure, Sir.

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  2. Replies
    1. I am working on putting that together right now. I will update the page once I post the link for the sample scenario.

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    2. Looking forward to trying some of the scenarios out.

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  3. Order is on the way. Not that I'm like to play it, lacking the figures, but I'm interested how you went about it and the CSIR history. DId you read Brian Sullivan, The Italian Soldier in Combat, June 1940-September 1943: Myths Realities and Explanations in Angus Calder and Paul Addison (eds), Time to Kill. The Soldier's Experience of War in the West 1939-1945? Very interesting! Advances the claim the Italian Army did well when not overstretched on too many fronts (ie during 1942).

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    1. I don't think I did. Those will go on my reading list. I was more interested in first hand accounts where ever possible. Those all look interesting. I would draw the same conclusions about the Italians on the East Front as you noticed. As long as they did not over reach, they did really well. Aggressive commanders such as Chiarimonti forced his men into bravery that they should not have due to pushing the limits of his supply chain and nearly loosing his regiment. His men held on tenaciously and fought very well with little ammo, food or even water. In East Africa they were no pushovers either, but again they were well beyond their ability to be resupplied.

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  4. Congratulations señor!
    looks excellent and I've already read some good reviews in other blogs
    Count on me for sure for one copy

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    1. Thanks. I appreciate it. Hopefully I will get a couple more reviews out there.

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    2. Pay my copy through Paypal this afternoon
      The sooner I get the book, the sooner I'll publish a review
      8^)

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    3. Read this afternoon. I must say that it has exceded my highest expectations. Great addition the bibliographic appendix and the historical introduction

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  5. Congratulations Chris. I hope your hard work pays out.

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    1. Thanks. I write mostly for me (which explains the obscure topics for the most part). Just making one sale is fun. I will never get back what I put into it but that is not really the point. The best part is finding someone posting an AAR of one of the scenarios and reading they enjoyed it.

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  6. well done that man great to see some thing you worked so hard on make it into print
    Peace James

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    1. Indeed. I had been working on this one, on and off, for over 5 years.

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  7. Congratulations, Chris. That sounds like a fantastic supplement - full marks for picking a hidden gem of a topic for the scenarios!

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    1. Thank you sir. I always have a soft spot for the fringe fronts.

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  8. Holy cow. Just looking at the sample, this is a great achievement - congratulations.

    I would like to do this for the actions undertaken by my Grandfather's unit. But most of them were pretty lopsided one way or the other.

    I created one scenario and it took me forever and needs lots of refining.

    I would be interested in your process.

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    1. Interesting question. The first is to find out if there are any first hand accounts of the battle. If you have any notes from your grandfather's unit, that would help out a bunch. Next is to get an idea of the terrain it was fought over. Period maps help a bunch. For WWII, you just can't beat http://www.wwii-photos-maps.com/. They have just an amazing amount of maps of the Soviet Union from German and Russian period sources. Get as detailed a map as possible. It just makes life easier. Then plot out what you want to show of the action. Just a platoon or a company or a battalion and beyond. Each one would make things different.

      Then decide what is the outcome you are looking for? IF it was a lopsided action, that is actually OK. Make it a holding action where the side that is likely to get flattened just has to hold on for x turns/phases/minutes/whatever to succeed.

      What battles did your Grandfather's unit fight in? I may have some books that could help you out.

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    2. 12th Armored Division - US - I do have some of the things you mentioned for one of their battles. But I'm trying to find out more so I could make 6 - 10 scenarios.

      But I like your idea of creating scenarios for different size actions. Because I could break their largest battle into several different actions.

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  9. The 15 minutes is here Chris, good luck on an interesting piece of the war.

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  10. Hi Chris,

    I'm currently working on figures painted as the 9th 'Pasubio' Division for use with Bolt Action rules (hopefully I will be able to post pictures of the first squad soon) so obviously very interested in your supplement. Would you accept a personal check as I'm unable to use Paypal at the moment (long story).

    Regards,
    Matt

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    1. Sure. Send me an e-mail and I will sort you out with an address and how we can proceed. Sounds like my e-bay story from a few months ago. cstoesen@corecard.com

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  11. Chris,

    Looks brilliant as usual! Congratulations!

    Joe

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  12. Just ordered it. Sorry, late to the party.

    It's been an hour, where's my pdf? Just kidding. :)

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    1. :) You caught me out of town. But I see you found the instant download option. Enjoy.

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  13. Ordered. Now I need to dig around and see who does the best Italians for the East Front. Really looking forward to this!

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    1. Mine are a mix of Peter Pig and Battlefront (FOW). But I do everything in 15mm. My 6mm Italians are from Adler. I am not sure about any of the larger scales. Old Glory's 15mm stuff all has the sun helmet so they are not useful for Greece, Spain, Yugoslavia, Albania or the Ukraine.

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